School For Good And Evil

The School for Good and Evil is really high up there on my list of favorite books/series. It’s an intriguing brilliant story by Soman Chainani about two young girls named Sophie and Agatha who live in a town called Gavaldon. Every four years the School Master comes to their town

Image result for school for good and evil cover

to kidnap two children, one good one evil, to go to the School for Good and Evil. That’s not the only peculiar thing though, afterwards a storybook comes out in the towns bookshop with the missing kids as characters. For example, the baker’s son Jack become the main character in Jack and the Beanstalk. On that year everybody in Gavaldon locks and bolts everything shut and prays their children will not be taken. Sophie has done everything in her power to make sure she gets chosen to go to the School for Good.She unlocks the bolts on her window, becomes friends with old hags,and helps feed the homeless.   I mean, she’s the perfect image of good, right? She is a beautiful blonde, loves the color pink, and has the voice of an angel. On the other hand Agatha is basically the opposite. Somehow they get picked to go to the school for good and evil… except Agatha is in the School for Good, and Sophie in the School for Evil. Together they will have to find a way to get back to Gavaldon. But throwing a boy in the mix might complicate things. Please make sure to read this series! Trust me, you’re doing yourself a favor by reading this book. I introduced my friend to the series and she has read faster than I have ever seen anyone read in my life and is already begging for the next book.

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Heidi

Hey everybody! So sorry I haven’t posted in a long time. Hope you enjoy this post!


heidi
Heidi is a lovely book adapted by Johanna Spyri. Heidi is a little girl who is five years old and is an orphan. She lives with her Aunt Detie. But when Heidi’s aunt gets a new job she can no longer keep the little girl. So Detie sends Heidi to go live with her grumpy elderly grandfather who lives up in the Swiss Alps. Gradually over time the sweet girl’s kindness and tenderness softens the old man’s heart. As soon as Heidi gets comfortable, Heidi’s Aunt Detie comes back and persuades the grandfather she has a job that has a role for Heidi to be a companion to a 12 year old girl whose legs are paralyzed. Heidi warms up to her new friend. But she immediately misses the mountains and yearns to be back. Do you think Heidi will ever go back and see her grandfather again, or will she be stuck living in a house that restrains her true self?

I especially loved this book because of the vivid descriptions and heart wrenching tales.  I hope that whoever is reading this decides to read this book. I definitely think this book would be among my list of favorites. But then again practically every book I read is on my favorite list. But seriously, read this book!

The Land of Stories : The Wishing Spell

Hi everybody! I’m so sorry I haven’t posted for a while.  But I am newly inspired and will try to post more often now that I am on summer break.  I am so excited about this book review, I don’t even know where to begin!  The book that I’m reviewing today is hands-down the best book that I’ve ever read.  And the best part?  It’s a series!  That means that I will be doing more book reports on other books in this series. But here is my book review. Enjoy!

The Land of Stories : The Wishing Spell is by Chris Colfer.  The Wishing Spell is about a boy and a girl named Alex and Conner. Alex and Conner are bored of life. Their dad had passed away just a year earlier and their mother has had to work extra shifts to keep them on their feet. When their twelfth birthday comes around their grandma comes to celebrate and gives them a book full of classical fairy tales from their childhood.

 Alex stores the book in her room and awakes in the middle of the night to hear a  strange buzzing noise that seems to be coming from the book. Alex alerts Conner and together they go closer to the book only to be suddenly whisked into the magical fairytale world. They soon find that they’re only choice to ever get back home again is to go around Fairyland collecting items from the most hated villains in Fairyland to conduct a spell that would send them back home. Along the way they meet some of the famous fairytale characters that they practically grew up with. But the characters stories didn’t end at their happily ever afters. Who knew that Little Red Riding Hood would end up with her own kingdom, Queen Cinderella about to become a mother, Goldilocks a wanted fugitive. Will Conner and Alex ever see their mother or home again? Read this book to find out.

I really like this book because the excitement never ends. One minute your in a icy cold cave with Sea Witch, and one minute you’re relaxing by the fire in Little Red Riding Hood’s castle. Once you start reading it you can’t put it down. Before you know it you’ll be on your knees begging for the next book. This book is no doubt my favorite book in the whole universe. You haven’t read a good book until you read this.

 

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane

“The Miraculous Journthemjofetey of Edward Tulane” is a book by the loved author, Kate Dicamillo. Kate Dicamillo has wrote tons of books through the years. From books about pigs who live in houses to china bunnies who are treated like royalty. You can always count on Kate for an imaginative new story.

“The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane” is about a girl named Abilene who has a stuffed bunny named Edward Tulane. One day Abilene and her family go on a cruise and Edward gets accidentally tossed overboard by two boys.

Edward goes from owner to owner. From the net of a fishermen to a hobos camp. But the question is will he survive and see Abilene…or will he never see her again?

Read “The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane” to find the answer, you will not be disappointed!

 

 

Space case

Spaced out is another awesome book by Stuart Gibbs and is the first book from the Moon Base Alpha series.

spacedoutDashiell Gibbson (also known as Dash) is seemingly a normal, average kid…except for one thing.  He lives on the moon.  People on Earth think life on the moon is awesome; but the truth is, the moon really stinks.  Dash is always bored and there is only one kid around his age whose name is Roddy.  But, Roddy isn’t very fun to be around because he obsessively spends all his time on virtual reality video games.

Dash’s days were boring, that is, until Moon Base Alpha’s top scientist, Dr. Holtz, gets murdered.  Dash has a feeling the murder was done on purpose, but nobody believes him.

Everyone thinks that Dr. Holtz just went out on to the lunar surface without his suit properly fixed.  But Dr. Holtz was on the edge of releasing a new discovery.  Dash soon finds out Dr. Holtz’s secret…and it’s a secret that could change everything for the moonies (people who live on the moon).  The secret is so deep, so critical, so intense that it could justify a murder. Read Spaced Out to find out what happens!

Poached

Poached is another wonderful book by Stuart Gibbs.  Poached is from his Funjungle series. I recently reviewed his first Funjungle book: Belly up. Poached is his second book.

poachedIn the book, Vance Jessup threatens Theodore Fitzroy (also known as Teddy) into doing an evil scheme for him. But then the plan doesn’t go as expected and causes a terrible situation to arise.  Teddy goes to hide in the koala exhibit to wait for everything to calm down. But the next morning, after the chaos seemingly subsided, people begin realizing that the koala was missing.

The zoo reviews the security cameras to find out what happened.  But, the only footage they see is  Teddy and he is accused of stealing the koala!  Now it’s up to Teddy to prove everybody wrong and hunt down the real thief…because if he doesn’t, he will have to go to juvenile camp as a convicted koala napper.

I highly recommend this book!  It was so captivating.

Stuart Gibbs is a talented writer that keeps your attention the whole time.  I’ll be reviewing all of his books, so be sure to follow along!  Thanks for reading!

Hello!

Hi everyone! My name is Elise.  I will be the new contributor to this blog.  As my cousin mentioned, I love to read a lot.  I read day and night.  Every opportunity I get, I am reading.  One of my favorite authors is Roald Dahl.  I love the way he incorporates poems into his work.  I enjoy a variety of books though and I’m really looking forward to sharing my point of view with all of you.

My favorite kind of genre is mystery.  I love mystery.  My favorite mystery book is Three Times Lucky by Sheila Turnage.  It was suspenseful and unpredictable, you never know what is going to happen next.  I have so many books I’ve enjoyed though and I’m excited to now have a forum to share them with others.  Now, for my first book review (eek!)…

BELLY UP

For my first book review I will review Belly Up.  Belly up is written by one of my all-time favorite authors, Stuart Gibbs.  Stuart Gibbs has three very popular series.

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Here are the three series:

1.  Moon Base Alpha

2.  Spy School

3.  Funjungle

The book I’m reviewing today is from the series Funjungle.  And the book is called Belly Up and it. is. so. Good!!!

So, Funjungle is a zoo and is owned by a famous billionaire named JJ McKracken.  And in the book, Belly Up, an animal murder mystery takes place.  The main character’s name is Teddy Fitzroy and it’s up to him to solve the mystery when nobody else will. JJ’s daughter, Summer McKracken, is a big help to Teddy and helps investigate.

I give this book 4.5 stars.   It’s a page turner and it’ll make you want to read the other books in the series.

Belly Up is the first book in the Funjungle series.  I know that once you read Belly Up, you’ll be motivated to read the next book in the series, which is Poached.  I’ll be reviewing this entire series, and books in his other series. So stay tuned folks!

Goodbye?

As you may have guessed from the title, as of today, I won’t be posting anymore on Tweens Read Too. This is something I’ve thought about for a long time, maybe the last six months, for a couple of reasons.

The first is that I realized my reading tastes are maturing. I’m slowly starting to creep into adult literature (though, admittedly, it’s a very slow creeping), and I’m betting that within the next four or five years, I will be primarily reading adult lit. With that comes a bit of moving on. I no longer read and absolutely love enough middle-grade to run a separate blog about it.

That being said, I still greatly enjoy the genre. There’s something about middle-grade that you can’t get from YA or children’s or adult or any other genre out there, and I don’t think I’ll ever fully move on from YA and MG lit. Because of that, I’ll be casually reading middle-grade when I find books I’m excited about and posting those reviews on my other book blog, The Silver Words. I also plan to hold Tweens Read August or some event like it again, but it’ll be on TSW instead of TRT.

The second reason I’ve thought about moving on is because time has gotten tight for me as of late. It used to be manageable, but I have several things going on right now, between standardized test prep and extracurriculars and projects and writing a novel and starting at community college. I still defend my reading time, but it’s not realistic for me or my schedule to be posting on two blogs all the time. It comes out to at least five posts released a week, sometimes more than that. Knowing what my schedule looks like for the next couple of months, I knew I couldn’t make it to the end of the year as I’d initially planned, so I decided to end it here.

All of those things aside, some of you have followed this blog since it began in June 2013. Some of you have followed it since a year ago, a month ago, yesterday, and to all of you, thank you so much. You can’t begin to imagine the gratitude I have towards all of my readers, and I hope that you’ll continue to follow my bookish journey on The Silver Words.  Thank you again, and happy reading.

BUT.

Someone else will be taking over the blog, and I’ll provide oversight and maybe even the occasional post. I’ve mentioned my cousin, another avid reader, on here once or twice. My cousin’ll be taking over the blog and providing most of the content, as well a bit of new style. Stay tuned for more info, and goodbye (for now)!

Review: Extraordinary by Miriam Spitzer Franklin

extraordinary by miriam spitzer franklin

Last spring, Pansy chickened out on going to spring break camp, even though she’d promised her best friend, Anna, she’d go. It was just like when they went to get their hair cut for Locks of Love; only one of them walked out with a new hairstyle, and it wasn’t Pansy. But Pansy never got the chance to make it up to Anna. While at camp, Anna contracted meningitis and a dangerously high fever, and she hasn’t been the same since. Now all Pansy wants is her best friend back—not the silent girl in the wheelchair who has to go to a special school and who can’t do all the things Pansy used to chicken out of doing. So when Pansy discovers that Anna is getting a surgery that might cure her, Pansy realizes this is her chance—she’ll become the friend she always should have been. She’ll become the best friend Anna’s ever had—even if it means taking risks, trying new things (like those scary roller skates), and running herself ragged in the process.

Pansy’s chasing extraordinary, hoping she reaches it in time for her friend’s triumphant return. But what lies at the end of Pansy’s journey might not be exactly what she had expected—or wanted.

Description taken from Goodreads.


Extraordinary is one of those books that I feel like I could’ve loved in elementary school but is ultimately not for me at this point. My problems with the story weren’t necessarily because there’s anything wrong with the book, but because I came in with two incorrect assumptions:

The first one has to do with target audience and age of the protagonist. I thought this was middle-grade. It’s not middle-grade. The protagonists are in fifth grade, and they read like they’re in third or fourth grade. Because of that, if I was to recommend this, I would recommend it to lower middle-grade readers.

Unfortunately, while I’m on the topic of the characters, the cast lacks the maturity of their age. There are books where the main characters feel like teenagers, feel like middle-graders, but this isn’t one of them. The voice and narration was very unnatural to me, and the events of the plot held no substance. Things happened, were supposed to have some sort of meaning, and then quickly moved on.

However, that’s not to say I didn’t enjoy the plot and the characters. Extraordinary struck me as the friendship version of Tricia Clasen’s The Haunted House Project, which was one of my Tweens Read August picks. Even though it was cliché in many ways, the friendship between Pansy and Anna was fun to read about. I also loved the coming-of-age nature of the story, which brings me to my second point.

I went in expecting Extraordinary to be a book about friendship. I love reading about friendships, especially broken ones, in middle-grade and YA, but more than anything else, Extraordinary is a coming-of-age type of book. Pansy grows tremendously over the course of the story, becoming her own person and learning how to live with the idea of not always being with Anna. That’s not to say they don’t end up together in the end. They go through their own share of troubles, but they have an incredible bond with each other.

In terms of the supporting cast, I adored the good family relationships in the story. There’s no Disappearing Parent Syndrome for Extraordinary. Anna’s problems tie in her entire family and Pansy’s entire family, and Pansy’s parents play strong roles as her supporters. This was great to see when much of middle-grade lit is moving toward stories where parents play minimal, if any, roles. The teachers within the story weren’t particularly memorable either, but I enjoyed their roles and support while I was in the story.

Also, on a side note, what kind of fifth grade class is still learning the multiplication tables for 2? I know personal experiences aren’t always accurate, so I took a look at IXL and they should be learning decimal/fraction multiplication and division, as well as exponents, probability, and ratios. I’m nit-picking, but it was little details that made this book seem younger than it’s intended for.

Strangely enough, by the end of the story, I realized that when I started this book, I was looking for another book along the lines of Jenny Han’s Shug or Rebecca Stead’s When You Reach Me. Both books are very deep and poignant, talking extensively about friendship, loss, and coming-of-age. Granted, those books are more middle-grade than children’s, but I would probably think of them first if someone wanted a recommendation. Overall, Extraordinary was a decent read, but I would only recommend for younger middle-grade readers and children’s lit readers. 2 stars.

ARC Review: The Changelings by Christina Soontornvat

the changelings by christina soontornvat

Izzy’s family has just moved to the most boring town in the country. But as time goes on, strange things start to happen; odd piles of stones appear around Izzy’s house, and her little sister Hen comes home full of stories about the witch next door.

Then, Hen disappears into the woods. She’s been whisked away to the land of Faerie, and it’s up to Izzy to save her. Joined there by a band of outlaw Changelings, Izzy and her new friends set out on a joint search-and-rescue mission across this foreign land which is at turns alluringly magical and utterly terrifying.

Description taken from Goodreads.


I feel like if I had read this during my middle-grade years, I could’ve loved it to death, but when I was reading it now, all I could do was point out the clichés to it. I think the problem with the story is that there’s next to nothing fresh about it. It’s interesting, and the characters are heartfelt, and the writing is cute, but there’s nothing super memorable there.

That being said, I did love Izzy and her adventures with the outlaws. Their trip through Faerie was entertaining, and I loved Izzy’s voice as a character. She’s bookish and clever, not necessarily strong or brave, but she grows over the course of the story and comes to home both within herself and with her family/friends.

Overall, I probably wouldn’t recommend this one. It’s cute, but it’s just not what I’m looking for. I’d much rather recommend Suzanne Collins’ Gregor the Overlander series, which has many of the same themes and was one of my first of these kinds of novels. Good read, but nothing I would come back to. 2 stars.