School For Good And Evil

The School for Good and Evil is really high up there on my list of favorite books/series. It’s an intriguing brilliant story by Soman Chainani about two young girls named Sophie and Agatha who live in a town called Gavaldon. Every four years the School Master comes to their town

Image result for school for good and evil cover

to kidnap two children, one good one evil, to go to the School for Good and Evil. That’s not the only peculiar thing though, afterwards a storybook comes out in the towns bookshop with the missing kids as characters. For example, the baker’s son Jack become the main character in Jack and the Beanstalk. On that year everybody in Gavaldon locks and bolts everything shut and prays their children will not be taken. Sophie has done everything in her power to make sure she gets chosen to go to the School for Good.She unlocks the bolts on her window, becomes friends with old hags,and helps feed the homeless.   I mean, she’s the perfect image of good, right? She is a beautiful blonde, loves the color pink, and has the voice of an angel. On the other hand Agatha is basically the opposite. Somehow they get picked to go to the school for good and evil… except Agatha is in the School for Good, and Sophie in the School for Evil. Together they will have to find a way to get back to Gavaldon. But throwing a boy in the mix might complicate things. Please make sure to read this series! Trust me, you’re doing yourself a favor by reading this book. I introduced my friend to the series and she has read faster than I have ever seen anyone read in my life and is already begging for the next book.

Heidi

Hey everybody! So sorry I haven’t posted in a long time. Hope you enjoy this post!


heidi
Heidi is a lovely book adapted by Johanna Spyri. Heidi is a little girl who is five years old and is an orphan. She lives with her Aunt Detie. But when Heidi’s aunt gets a new job she can no longer keep the little girl. So Detie sends Heidi to go live with her grumpy elderly grandfather who lives up in the Swiss Alps. Gradually over time the sweet girl’s kindness and tenderness softens the old man’s heart. As soon as Heidi gets comfortable, Heidi’s Aunt Detie comes back and persuades the grandfather she has a job that has a role for Heidi to be a companion to a 12 year old girl whose legs are paralyzed. Heidi warms up to her new friend. But she immediately misses the mountains and yearns to be back. Do you think Heidi will ever go back and see her grandfather again, or will she be stuck living in a house that restrains her true self?

I especially loved this book because of the vivid descriptions and heart wrenching tales.  I hope that whoever is reading this decides to read this book. I definitely think this book would be among my list of favorites. But then again practically every book I read is on my favorite list. But seriously, read this book!

The Land of Stories : The Wishing Spell

Hi everybody! I’m so sorry I haven’t posted for a while.  But I am newly inspired and will try to post more often now that I am on summer break.  I am so excited about this book review, I don’t even know where to begin!  The book that I’m reviewing today is hands-down the best book that I’ve ever read.  And the best part?  It’s a series!  That means that I will be doing more book reports on other books in this series. But here is my book review. Enjoy!

The Land of Stories : The Wishing Spell is by Chris Colfer.  The Wishing Spell is about a boy and a girl named Alex and Conner. Alex and Conner are bored of life. Their dad had passed away just a year earlier and their mother has had to work extra shifts to keep them on their feet. When their twelfth birthday comes around their grandma comes to celebrate and gives them a book full of classical fairy tales from their childhood.

 Alex stores the book in her room and awakes in the middle of the night to hear a  strange buzzing noise that seems to be coming from the book. Alex alerts Conner and together they go closer to the book only to be suddenly whisked into the magical fairytale world. They soon find that they’re only choice to ever get back home again is to go around Fairyland collecting items from the most hated villains in Fairyland to conduct a spell that would send them back home. Along the way they meet some of the famous fairytale characters that they practically grew up with. But the characters stories didn’t end at their happily ever afters. Who knew that Little Red Riding Hood would end up with her own kingdom, Queen Cinderella about to become a mother, Goldilocks a wanted fugitive. Will Conner and Alex ever see their mother or home again? Read this book to find out.

I really like this book because the excitement never ends. One minute your in a icy cold cave with Sea Witch, and one minute you’re relaxing by the fire in Little Red Riding Hood’s castle. Once you start reading it you can’t put it down. Before you know it you’ll be on your knees begging for the next book. This book is no doubt my favorite book in the whole universe. You haven’t read a good book until you read this.

 

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane

“The Miraculous Journthemjofetey of Edward Tulane” is a book by the loved author, Kate Dicamillo. Kate Dicamillo has wrote tons of books through the years. From books about pigs who live in houses to china bunnies who are treated like royalty. You can always count on Kate for an imaginative new story.

“The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane” is about a girl named Abilene who has a stuffed bunny named Edward Tulane. One day Abilene and her family go on a cruise and Edward gets accidentally tossed overboard by two boys.

Edward goes from owner to owner. From the net of a fishermen to a hobos camp. But the question is will he survive and see Abilene…or will he never see her again?

Read “The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane” to find the answer, you will not be disappointed!

 

 

Space case

Spaced out is another awesome book by Stuart Gibbs and is the first book from the Moon Base Alpha series.

spacedoutDashiell Gibbson (also known as Dash) is seemingly a normal, average kid…except for one thing.  He lives on the moon.  People on Earth think life on the moon is awesome; but the truth is, the moon really stinks.  Dash is always bored and there is only one kid around his age whose name is Roddy.  But, Roddy isn’t very fun to be around because he obsessively spends all his time on virtual reality video games.

Dash’s days were boring, that is, until Moon Base Alpha’s top scientist, Dr. Holtz, gets murdered.  Dash has a feeling the murder was done on purpose, but nobody believes him.

Everyone thinks that Dr. Holtz just went out on to the lunar surface without his suit properly fixed.  But Dr. Holtz was on the edge of releasing a new discovery.  Dash soon finds out Dr. Holtz’s secret…and it’s a secret that could change everything for the moonies (people who live on the moon).  The secret is so deep, so critical, so intense that it could justify a murder. Read Spaced Out to find out what happens!

Poached

Poached is another wonderful book by Stuart Gibbs.  Poached is from his Funjungle series. I recently reviewed his first Funjungle book: Belly up. Poached is his second book.

poachedIn the book, Vance Jessup threatens Theodore Fitzroy (also known as Teddy) into doing an evil scheme for him. But then the plan doesn’t go as expected and causes a terrible situation to arise.  Teddy goes to hide in the koala exhibit to wait for everything to calm down. But the next morning, after the chaos seemingly subsided, people begin realizing that the koala was missing.

The zoo reviews the security cameras to find out what happened.  But, the only footage they see is  Teddy and he is accused of stealing the koala!  Now it’s up to Teddy to prove everybody wrong and hunt down the real thief…because if he doesn’t, he will have to go to juvenile camp as a convicted koala napper.

I highly recommend this book!  It was so captivating.

Stuart Gibbs is a talented writer that keeps your attention the whole time.  I’ll be reviewing all of his books, so be sure to follow along!  Thanks for reading!

Hello!

Hi everyone! My name is Elise.  I will be the new contributor to this blog.  As my cousin mentioned, I love to read a lot.  I read day and night.  Every opportunity I get, I am reading.  One of my favorite authors is Roald Dahl.  I love the way he incorporates poems into his work.  I enjoy a variety of books though and I’m really looking forward to sharing my point of view with all of you.

My favorite kind of genre is mystery.  I love mystery.  My favorite mystery book is Three Times Lucky by Sheila Turnage.  It was suspenseful and unpredictable, you never know what is going to happen next.  I have so many books I’ve enjoyed though and I’m excited to now have a forum to share them with others.  Now, for my first book review (eek!)…

BELLY UP

For my first book review I will review Belly Up.  Belly up is written by one of my all-time favorite authors, Stuart Gibbs.  Stuart Gibbs has three very popular series.

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Here are the three series:

1.  Moon Base Alpha

2.  Spy School

3.  Funjungle

The book I’m reviewing today is from the series Funjungle.  And the book is called Belly Up and it. is. so. Good!!!

So, Funjungle is a zoo and is owned by a famous billionaire named JJ McKracken.  And in the book, Belly Up, an animal murder mystery takes place.  The main character’s name is Teddy Fitzroy and it’s up to him to solve the mystery when nobody else will. JJ’s daughter, Summer McKracken, is a big help to Teddy and helps investigate.

I give this book 4.5 stars.   It’s a page turner and it’ll make you want to read the other books in the series.

Belly Up is the first book in the Funjungle series.  I know that once you read Belly Up, you’ll be motivated to read the next book in the series, which is Poached.  I’ll be reviewing this entire series, and books in his other series. So stay tuned folks!

ARC Review: Time Traveling with a Hamster by Ross Welford

time traveling with a hamster by ross welford

Back to the Future meets The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time in this original, poignant, race-against-time story about a boy who travels back to 1984 to save his father’s life.

My dad died twice. Once when he was thirty-nine and again four years later, when he was twelve. On his twelfth birthday, Al Chaudhury receives a letter from his dead father. It directs him to the bunker of their old house, where Al finds a time machine (an ancient computer and a tin bucket). The letter also outlines a mission: travel back to 1984 and prevent the go-kart accident that will eventually take his father’s life. But as Al soon discovers, whizzing back thirty years requires not only imagination and courage, but also lying to your mom, stealing a moped, and setting your school on fire—oh, and keeping your pet hamster safe. With a literary edge and tons of commerical appeal, this incredible debut has it all: heart, humor, vividly imagined characters, and a pitch-perfect voice.

Description taken from Goodreads.


I was prepared for the worst with this book. Between the blurb, the cover, and the title, I was fully prepared to put it down 20% of the way through as an unfortunate disappointment. But no, Time Traveling with a Hamster demanded to be loved and read, and it reminded me why I continue to read middle-grade lit.

I think what I love about this story is that it’s so no-nonsense. It gets right to the heart of the story, never stopping to dwell on the ridiculousness of the situation. Between Al’s authentic voice and the great pacing, it’s easy to get lost in the magic of the story. I’ll admit that I was skeptical in the beginning, but shortly after I got into the story, I realized it’s perfectly reasonable to write a story about time traveling with a hamster.

The plot and writing were spot-on. I especially loved the way that Al got to explore his relationships with his dad and grandpa because of the time travel, though I wasn’t impressed by his bad relationship with his step-sister. There were points in the story that were cliché or felt like they were formatting ideas derived from other writers (ten facts about one of the characters, a chapter move that I dislike immensely because it breaks the story apart). I was disappointed by this, especially in the beginning, because of how impressed I was by Welford’s writing.

All in all, I would recommend Time Traveling with a Hamster to boys and girls through middle school and maybe a little younger. Honestly, it’s great for anyone willing to give it a chance. The humor is spot on, the story is exciting enough to keep impatient readers going, it has heartfelt characters, and the ending is satisfactory. A great read. 4 stars.

Review: My Seventh Grade Life in Tights by Brooks Benjamin

my seventh grade life in tights by brooks benjamin

LIVE IT.

All Dillon wants is to be a real dancer. And if he wins a summer scholarship at Dance-Splosion, he’s on his way. The problem? His dad wants him to play football. And Dillon’s freestyle crew, the Dizzee Freekz, says that dance studios are for sellouts. His friends want Dillon to kill it at the audition—so he can turn around and tell the studio just how wrong their rules and creativity-strangling ways are.

WORK IT.

At first, Dillon’s willing to go along with his crew’s plan, even convincing one of the snobbiest girls at school to work with him on his technique. But as Dillon’s dancing improves, he wonders: what if studios aren’t the enemy? And what if he actually has a shot at winning the scholarship?

BRING IT.

Dillon’s life is about to get crazy . . . on and off the dance floor.

Description taken from Goodreads.


My Seventh Grade Life in Tights had everything I wanted, and more. It was sassy and smart and heartfelt, and I was rooting for Dillon every step of the way. The structure was there, from the pacing to the premise to the world-building. From the start, I loved his voice and character, but what really made the story was the friendships.

love great supporting character friendships, so much so that it’s currently my pinned tweet, and My Seventh Grade Life in Tights delivered. I felt Dillon’s struggles with reconcile his dreams with his relationships with his friends, and it was a great representation of the collection of lows and highs that seventh grade is.

Also a plus on that count, there’s plenty of diversity in this story. Brooks smashed clichés and stereotypes throughout the book, and I loved seeing that.

Another thing that this book has going for it is Dillon, whose passion for dance is inspiring. He’s trying to enter into an adult world at a young age, and I respect that. He tries really hard at what he does, he doesn’t give up, and he’s genuine all at the same time. I enjoy seeing kids who are passionate about something represented in stories, and by the end of the book, I was ready to have more of Dillon! In particular, I would love to see who he becomes as a young adult, if that were ever an option :D

All in all, the book was superb. It hit all the right notes, and I’m even happier that I got the chance to work with Brooks during Tweens Read August. I had a ton of fun with the book, and I’ll be recommending it. 4.5 stars.

Review: School of the Dead by Avi

school of the dead by avi

From Newbery Medalist Avi comes the spine-tingling story of Tony Gilbert, who must solve a mystery surrounding the ghost of his uncle Charlie.

For most of Tony Gilbert’s life, he always thought of his uncle as “Weird Uncle Charlie.” That is, until Uncle Charlie moves in with Tony and his family. He’s still odd, of course—talking about spirits and other supernatural stuff—but Uncle Charlie and Tony become fast friends. Between eating ice cream and going to the movies, Tony is having more fun with Uncle Charlie than he ever could have imagined.

So when Uncle Charlie dies suddenly, Tony is devastated. So sad, in fact, he starts seeing Uncle Charlie everywhere! Tony recently transferred to the Penda School, where Uncle Charlie went as a kid. The school is eerie enough on its own without his uncle’s ghost making it worse. On top of which, rumors have been circulating about a student who went missing shortly before Tony arrived. Could that and Uncle Charlie’s ghost be related?

Full of twists and turns that get spookier by the chapter, School of the Dead is a fast-paced mystery that Avi’s fans will devour!

Description taken from Goodreads.


I’ve never been a huge fan of Avi, but the premise of School of the Dead won me over. I was curious to see what the story would be like, and I ended up enjoying it much more than I expected. However, as others have correctly noted, the twist at the end is a bit easy to guess by the middle of the novel. I’m sure mature middle-grade readers will be able to guess it fairly easily, but I still had a lot of fun with the story, so I don’t think it’ll be a major turn-off.

Even though I enjoyed the plot and the characters, two things wavered for me throughout the story. The first is the fact that the book isn’t scary. I don’t think it would be scary for anyone. It does the ghost cliché, it works within its premise, but it’s nothing shocking or wholly original.

The second is the writing. Avi’s writing doesn’t give me the voice of a middle-grader. Tony felt much older than his age much of the time. Avi’s writing tends to favor the same kind of cool detachment as Kate DiCamillo’s work. I’m not saying that’s a bad thing. In fact, I enjoyed it, but I don’t know how the target audience will receive it. If you’re looking for whimsical and action-packed, this isn’t the book for you.

It’s lack of originality and it’s writing made me question how easily its target audience will fall in love with it, but I know a few kids who loved books like Anya’s Ghost that could appreciate a story like this. The rest of the book was pretty solid, and I’ll be recommending it. 3 stars.